The LSP Revolution

Remember the days when you had to look for plugins for your editor to support your favourite programming language? Or even the language that isn’t your favourite, but which for some reason you need to write in? Well in case you didn’t notice, those days are gone. They aren’t “long gone,” but the are gone. I thought they weren’t gone, but they are. Gone. For real. Because there’s LSP. What started as an interface between VS Code and completion engines at Microsoft, became the godsend for all of us that want to declare “dotfile bankruptcy” every couple of months.

Bargaining with my left-wing indulgence

Yesterday I read Rutger Bregman’s excellent opinion piece in The Correspondent, and today is Tuesday. Tuesday, in my household, is the recycling day. Why Tuesday? Because the island we live on only has 2 paper trash containers. They are emptied on Tuesdays midday-ish, so on Tuesday evenings I pack all the paper trash in the house (along with all the glass and plastic) into the trunk, and I put them into the container before it gets full (it’ll be full by Wednesday night at the latest).

Intel supremacy days are over (it seems)

Hey, remember when you could buy a computer, or a workstation, or a server, that didn’t run on x86, or at least Intel? Remember those violet Sun Fire servers with SPARC processors? How about AMD Athlons and Opterons? Some weeks ago I read an insightful article about the “untimely demise” of workstations and how the rise of commodity hardware killed vertically integrated, high-end computers, the same way it killed non-x86 servers.

The Four Stages of Staycation

Planning I’m gonna read a book a day. I’m gonna go through SICP (including all the exercises) and Kurt’s new Haskell book. I’m gonna learn how to play bass. I’m gonna buy that wardrobe for the guest room so that we could get rid of the ugly coat hanger there. Depression & self-loathing Weather is really shit, I should have and could have gone somewhere nice. COVID-19 situation in Spain cannot be as bad as they say, people travel after all.

How not to interview software engineers

Don’t ask them to do an overly time-consuming assignment, unless you’re going to pay them. If they need to spend more than a couple of hours and you expect the solution to ship a full suite of tests, you’re doing it wrong. Live-coding is fine, but tell them in advance. Some people get very stressed during those interviews, so make sure they can prepare, technically and emotionally (also they may need a drink or seven, which I think is totally fine).

Contesting

Enjoy the Best, Not The Latest, Media – Kartick’s Blog: In fact, tried and tested is the best. Here’s a list of the top TV series, for example. Notice that the #1, Breaking Bad, ended in 2013. If people are still talking about it after so many years, it must be really good. Whatever effect marketing or “coolness” have has dissipated after some years. I’ve heard this sentiment before: “I don’t go for the latest, I only read classics.

“Twilight of Democracy”

Here’s what’s good about Anne Applebaum’s new book: it’s anecdotal in all the right places. This is a book that attempts to explain the authoritarian turns across Europe and in the United States and Applebaum, as you’d expect from her, provides a convincing, well-reasoned and insightful explanation as to why they are happening. And since she’s a well renowned international journalist and a wife to Poland’s former minister of foreign affairs, she’s been at the center of many of the important political events of the last decades (hence the anecdotes).

VS Code

The best, most entertaining and immortal topic in software engineering is back! Editor Wars! After reading Roben Kleene’s blog post I realized that I’ve been using VS Code all-day every-day for over a year now. I’m not willing to admit it because in my mind I’m a die-hard (n)vim user, but the reality is this: VS Code is brilliant. Kleene makes many great points about key ingredients of VS Code’s success (popularity/MS backing, plugin ecosystem, client-server architecture), and you should read his post.

We should cherish email

Recent launch of Basecamp’s Hey service made me realize how much I love email. Their pitch is actually on point: Email gets a bad rap, but it shouldn’t. Email’s a treasure. Damn right it is. Email is a set of open protocols. We can argue about the “implementability” of IMAP clients and such, but it remains the only widely used, open communication system we have on the internet. XMPP was supposed to become its equivalent for instant messaging, but failed, and no other protocol took its place because it’s in no messaging platform’s interest to give its users freedom of choice.

2020 Core i5 Apple Macbook Air Detailed Review

It’s brilliant. Ok fine, let’s do a small Q&A no one asked for. Doesn’t it get a bit hot and noisy under load? It does, but it rarely happens. Actually I don’t even run tbswitcher on it. It’s not a good laptop if your aim is to run XCode or multiple Docker containers regularly, and neither is this a good laptop for editing videos in Premiere Pro. But you knew that already didn’t you?